Deborah landau

from The Uses of the Body

That curiosity seems to exist in all of us innately. Writing is play; revising a poem can feel like work. This collection feels especially unified to me, in its tone, and subject matter.

A therapist once reassured me that the world needs writers to say the things we all feel but are ashamed to say. Article continues after advertisement Adam Fitzgerald: The wedding is over.

It was so beautiful there, but so isolating also—the car culture, the dead quiet on neighborhood streets in the middle of the afternoon.

My grandmother fled Germany in and never had the opportunity to get an education she and my grandfather worked in a grocery store in Detroit, then later opened a meatpacking business in the Eastern Market. Transformations is a good book to teach, and a lot of fun, especially for undergraduates, and helpful too as an illustration of poetic revision.

She forces us to see the rawness of being human. A favorite teacher of mine used to say that we crave the strangeness of others. I like giving readings, I like letters from readers, I like to share poems with friends.

In contrast, the final section Late Summer came in an outpouring of language that felt much more lush and expansive.

Deborah Landau PT

Wisteria grows along my office window. What draws you to the idea of lyric sequences, the novelistic through verse. To see more, visit http: Sometimes Landau gets really interior, examining organs growing older in their plush pockets, ticking toward the wearing out.

Too fat to graze, slothing up Park to the doctor. Thanks for mirroring the book back to me in such a smart way. Her attitude towards mortality is flippant here.

At night, down the hall into the bedroom we go. When writing autobiographically about your children or your sex life, do you ever have to overcome your fear of being embarrassed. What do you like most about it. You mention Transformations as a good book to teach.

What was your first thought after the birth of your kids. Because of his music and life force and eroticism, and for wisdom such as: That curiosity seems to exist in all of us innately.

Have you seen an evolution in your generative process over the three collections. While I was in Paris that summer one of my closest friends was home in New York, watching her young husband die. It would be hard to say how many iterations a poem goes through before it seems finished, but typically many more than five or ten or even twenty.

Favorite places to read and write in Brooklyn besides home, assuming you like to be there. It was so beautiful there, but so isolating also—the car culture, the dead quiet on neighborhood streets in the middle of the afternoon.

I try to power down at night so I can be present for the people who matter most to me. It often feels like writing provides both a record and a relief in expression. I feel fortunate to get up every day and read poems and write poems and talk with friends and colleagues and students about poems.

Deborah Landau is the author of three collections of poetry. Her poems have appeared in The Paris Review, Poetry, The New Yorker, Tin House, and The New York Times.

She directs the Creative Writing Program at New York University and lives in makomamoa.coms: 2. View Deborah Landau’s full profile. It's free!

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Your colleagues, classmates, and million other professionals are on LinkedIn. View Deborah’s Full Profile. “Deborah Landau is (a) fierce poet of desire Her stunning third book, The Uses of the Body, offers a meditation on aging and loss: a series of elegant, long poems that sing, hesitate and haunt.”.

Deborah Landau directs the Creative Writing Program at New York University. Her fourth collection of poems, “Soft Targets,” will be published in the spring. Read more». Landau's most recent book, The Uses of the Body, was published in by Copper Canyon Press and was a Lannan Literary Selection.

Deborah Landau is currently director of the Creative Writing Program at New York University. Deborah Landau, what is the most satisfying part of writing poetry for you? The hope of connecting with another person through language.

Deborah landau
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Deborah Landau, Author at Plume